31
Aug

My Path To Becoming A Buddhist | Emma Slade | TEDxSevenoaksSchool


Translator: Tijana Mihajlović
Reviewer: Peter van de Ven You are cowering on the floor. Above you is an unknown man. He is pointing a gun at your head. He has your life in his hands. What matters to you now? What do you know which is of any use? This is the situation I found myself in in September 1997, in a hotel room in Jakarta, Indonesia. I believe it was
the start of my awakening. At the time of this incident, I was working in the financial
markets in Hong Kong, making significant size
investments for a global bank. I had made the decision
to move into a financial career after the death of my father. He had always felt
that I would suit such a career, and so I finished my studies in Fine Art and decided to grow up
and get a proper job. And I loved it;
it was fast, it was exciting. I had placements in New York,
London, Hong Kong. I ate balance sheets for breakfast. (Laughter) I wore high heels
and I walked with a wiggle. (Laughter) And then came Jakarta. As the door opened,
I took my chance and I ran. And my body escaped. But in the days that followed, I began to suffer
what I was later to discover was severe post-traumatic stress disorder. In this condition, the past and the present
know no difference. So I would be sitting
in my office in Hong Kong, looking at those balance sheets, as I could smell his skin against my body, as I could hear his shoes
moving back and forth towards me. In the yogic and Buddhist tradition, we have a metaphor
for the development of a human being – the total development of a human being – and it’s that of the lotus flower. Now, the lotus flower begins in the mud, in the base of a lake, and from there it grows up, up, up, looking for light, looking for the Sun
and the surface of the water. Jakarta was my mud. But it was also the seed
of my future development. As I lay cowering on the floor, I knew the preciousness of a human life and I knew its impermanence. Also, a seed of compassion was planted, and I’ll explain. As I left, and I ran out of the door
and down the corridor, behind me many armed men
ran into the room. There was much gunfire. And later on that evening,
when I sat down with the police, they showed me a photograph of the man. And he was slumped against the hotel wall in his underpants. And around him the spatters
of blood, everywhere. And they were very pleased
to show me this photograph. And I looked at it, and I felt such sorrow; such sorrow for this man,
such sorrow for this situation. And this moment and this feeling, out of all of these moments
and all of these feelings, is the one I don’t forget. Now, back in England I had help to recover from post-traumatic
stress disorder. Once I had recovered enough
to see my life clearly, I felt that I’d been treating it
very superficially, and that after this experience,
I really needed to inquire more deeply into what it is to be a human being, what the potential
of a human being might be. And so I resigned my job, and I stumbled across yoga, and I found I was naturally
very adept at yoga. I pursued it, enjoyed it, and it helped me gain trust
in myself and the world again. At the same time,
I began to look more closely at a long-held interest
in the nature of mind, particularly as described
in Buddhist practice. And this is the reclining Buddha
of my grandfather, which I saw as a child in our home, and which always I wanted
to have near me, and that is still with me now. As a result of this interest in Buddhism, I visited a Buddhist monastery. And I heard in this
Buddhist monastery this mantra. It’s called “The Great
Mantra of Compassion.” You see it and hear it
all across the Himalayas. When I heard this mantra,
it really touched something in me, something very deep in me,
buried deep in me, I think. Now, there’s many ways to say this mantra. With the risk of being spiritual X-factor, I’m going to just show you the way
that I like to say it, okay? (Singing “The Great Mantra of Compassion”) Something like that. Now, I continued to teach
yoga and meditation and investigate Buddhism for many years. And then I probably reached
some kind of ceiling, here in the West. But I was lucky enough to get
the opportunity to go to Bhutan, the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan, in 2011. And when I went there – that’s somewhere I’d wanted
to visit for a long time – I met a monk in a temple and something very profound happened. I returned to England and then I decided to go back
to Bhutan to find him because something had happened there. So I returned to find him and discovered that he was a Lama. A Lama is someone in Bhutan
who must have done at least three years, three months,
three weeks solitary retreat. So he’s somebody who’s specialized
in the nature of mind. And it was obvious that he was my teacher
and I was his student. And after that, things went very fast. Here’s my Lama.
(Laughs) Obviously, when I first met my Lama, I still had my hair and normal clothes, but in 2012 he said to me,
out of the blue, “Now you change your dress,” and he was telling me
to become a Buddhist nun; he was telling me to give up
lay occupation, to become celibate, and to train my mind
for the benefit of others. I was amazed that he suggested it and, of course, said yes.
(Laughs) So I began the preliminary practices
and trainings of a nun: many prayers, many meditations. I began to study the language of Tibet, classical Tibetan language. And I kind of thought,
“I’m peaceful now. I’ve made it.” And as it says here,
I was ready to put my slippers on, maybe look at the sky. But all that compassion practice,
all those mantras, they had affected me, in fact. And I realized that I wanted
to give back to Bhutan, the country that I love so much, and I also wanted to put my wish
to be a compassionate person … into action. And so, in 2015,
I founded this UK charity. It’s called “Opening
your heart to Bhutan.” And this is a favorite thing of mine: to be with the children that we help. This is Tenzin Wangchuk in Eastern Bhutan. He has a cerebral palsy
but he’s a fantastic artist, and I’m there looking at
his artwork with him. This is another child in East Bhutan who spontaneously just came
and gave me this hug. This child is actually blind
but came and hugged me. And this is really why I do what I do
in far-reaching places of Bhutan: bringing practical help,
education, medical supplies, etc. to children who need my help. Of course, it’s ironic now that my financial training
is of great help in running a UK charity
and running many projects in Bhutan, organizing many people,
looking at the costings of things, inquiring about how to achieve
things on the ground. So the skills of old have been very useful in bringing me now
a very meaningful and happy life. Now, in terms of your own
process of awakening, I would really like to share with you
that your life is in your hands. But you should ask
what matters to you now. What do you know which is of any use? More of what I know is here and here. Thank you very much. (Applause)

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100 Comments

  • Patrick Ciacco says:

    Ahhhhhh Sooooooo!, Budda say… If a bear shits in the woods and nobody's around to smell it… Does it still stink?

  • alex i says:

    To those who say that Buddhism is not a religion:
    If you search the modern meaning of the word 'religion', or even its possible etymologies, it becomes very easy to say that Buddhism is a religion. A religion doesn't always imply the belief in a supreme being. That is a very strict and biased view.
    According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, 'religion' can be defined as: a personal set or institutionalized system of religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices. In this modern definition, there is no mention of a supreme being. Buddhism obviously is a set of beliefs and practices.

  • brotaxo 123 says:

    I am Buddhist

  • S Shahid says:

    Thanks for sharing. So simple and true. "Now in terms of your own purposes of awakening, I would like to share with you that your life lies in your hands, but you should ask, what matters to you now? What do you know which is of any use?"Emma Slade.

  • John Miller says:

    ☺️🌹🙏

  • Damian Smith says:

    Such a precious soul – thank you

  • Joel Fernandez says:

    Why do monks shave off their heads?! Anyone?!

  • Joe Mel says:

    Some Leftist and Right Conservatives are prob thinking, `what, she never spoke about babies, standing behind your man..

  • Lakshmi Liyanaarachchi says:

    🙏🙏🙏

  • වින්දන සී.වී says:

    In this Hustle and Bustle world, you have chosen the right path in which to path of Nirvana that will help us to still our innerself.A Sri Lankan

  • Peninah Mumbi says:

    Christ is the only way – "These will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life."

  • Søham says:

    AT THE IT'S THE OM THE SANATANA MANTRA MOTHER OF ALL MANTRAS

  • Musa Khan says:

    nonsense to nonsense! leaving one monasticism, that drove people seeking benefit behind 100% infallibility of popes, to another monasticism seeking benefit behind 100% infallibility of the lamas! the common excuse of monastic priests is divine bloodline, dreams and places, and then get high status in that society with the "sacred" books silent on the punishments of crimes! just cuz someone says so and no punishments if someone steals or robs!

  • Abdullah Masood says:

    And the Blessed One replied: "I am not the first Buddha who came upon earth, nor shall I be the last. In due time another Buddha will arise in the world, a Holy One, a supremely enlightened One, endowed with wisdom in conduct, auspicious, knowing the universe, an incomparable leader of men, a master of angels and mortals. He will reveal to you the same eternal truths which I have taught you. He will preach his religion, glorious in its origin, glorious at the climax, and glorious at the goal, in the spirit and in the letter. He will proclaim a religious life, wholly perfect and pure; such as I now proclaim."

    Ananda said: "How shall we know him?" The Blessed One said: "He will be known as Metteyya, which means 'he whose name is kindness.'"

    Blind woman, follow Muhammad. Funny thing is Buddah believes in angels.

  • tseten wanma says:

    པདྨ་དེ་འདམ་ལས་སྐྱེས་ནའང་འདམ་གྱི་སྐྱོན་གྱིས་མ་གོས་པ་བཞིན་དུ། ཤེསརབ་ལའང་རང་
    ཉིད་འགལ་དུ་མི་ཡོང་བའི་སར་འཇོག་པའི་ནུས་པ་ཡོད་ལ་གལ་ཏེ་ཤེས་རབ་མེད་ན་འགལ་
    དུ་ཡོང་གི་ཡོད་ཤེས་རབ་ལ་མི་རྟག་པ་རྟོགས་པའི་ཤེས་རབ་དང་། གང་ཟག་རང་རྐྱ་བའམ་
    རྫས་ཡོད་ཀྱིས་སྟོང་པར་རྟོགས་པའི་ཤེས་རབ། རང་གི་མཚན་ཉིད་ཀྱིས་གྲུབ་པས་སྟོང་པ་
    རྟོགས་པའི་ཤེས་རབ་བཅས་ཤེས་རབ་ལ་རིགས་མི་འདྲ་བ་དུ་མ་ཞིག་ཡོད་རུང་། གཙོ་བོ་
    ནི་སྟོང་ཉིད་རྟོགས་པའི་ཤེས་རབ་དེ་ཡིན

  • war ran says:

    This is what mental illness looks like.

  • Deepak Kadam says:

    She is showing world, how to live joyful and spread happiness, really joyful video.

  • james flood says:

    201 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    210 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    Read the New Testament as a book of seduction: virtue is
    appropriated in the instinct that with it one can capture public
    opinion — and indeed the most modest virtue, which recognizes
    the ideal sheep and nothing further (including the shepherd — ):
    a little, sweet, well-meaning, helpful, and enthusiastically cheer-
    ful kind of virtue that expects absolutely nothing from the outside
    — that sets itself altogether apart from “the world.” The most ab-
    surd arrogance, as if on one hand the community represented all
    that is right, and on the other the world all that is false, eternally
    reprehensible, and rejected, and as if the destiny of mankind re-
    volved about this fact. The most absurd hatred toward everything
    in power: but without touching it! A kind of inner detachment that
    outwardly leaves everything as it was (servitude and slavery; to
    know how to turn everything into a means of serving God and
    virtue).

    a=1 b=2 c=2 Emma Slade Cambridge Buddha Bashi !! Intereting Nietzsche

  • james flood says:

    201 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    However modest one may be in one’s demand for intellectual
    cleanliness, one cannot help feeling, when coming into contact with
    the New Testament, a kind of inexpressible discomfiture: for the
    unchecked impudence with which the least qualified want to raise
    their voice on the greatest problems, and even claim to be judges
    of such things, surpasses all measure. The shameless levity with
    which the most intractable problems (life, world, God, purpose
    of life) are spoken of, as if they were not problems at all but
    simply things that these little bigots knew!

    james flood
    1 second ago
    201 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    210 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    Read the New Testament as a book of seduction: virtue is
    appropriated in the instinct that with it one can capture public
    opinion — and indeed the most modest virtue, which recognizes
    the ideal sheep and nothing further (including the shepherd — ):
    a little, sweet, well-meaning, helpful, and enthusiastically cheer-
    ful kind of virtue that expects absolutely nothing from the outside
    — that sets itself altogether apart from “the world.” The most ab-
    surd arrogance, as if on one hand the community represented all
    that is right, and on the other the world all that is false, eternally
    reprehensible, and rejected, and as if the destiny of mankind re-
    volved about this fact. The most absurd hatred toward everything
    in power: but without touching it! A kind of inner detachment that
    outwardly leaves everything as it was (servitude and slavery; to
    know how to turn everything into a means of serving God and
    virtue).

    a=1 b=2 c=2 e+ m 5+ 13 etc Emma Slade Cambridge Buddha Bashi !! Intereting Nietzsche
    james flood
    1 second ago
    201 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    210 ( Spring-Fall 1887 )

    Read the New Testament as a book of seduction: virtue is
    appropriated in the instinct that with it one can capture public
    opinion — and indeed the most modest virtue, which recognizes
    the ideal sheep and nothing further (including the shepherd — ):
    a little, sweet, well-meaning, helpful, and enthusiastically cheer-
    ful kind of virtue that expects absolutely nothing from the outside
    — that sets itself altogether apart from “the world.” The most ab-
    surd arrogance, as if on one hand the community represented all
    that is right, and on the other the world all that is false, eternally
    reprehensible, and rejected, and as if the destiny of mankind re-
    volved about this fact. The most absurd hatred toward everything
    in power: but without touching it! A kind of inner detachment that
    outwardly leaves everything as it was (servitude and slavery; to
    know how to turn everything into a means of serving God and
    virtue).

    a=1 b=2 c=2 e+ m 5+ 13 etc Emma Slade Cambridge Buddha Bash !! Intereting Nietzsche

  • james flood says:

    Emma Slade Cambridge Buddha Bash !! Intereting Nietzsche this time

  • james flood says:

    you should see Madingly Hall at that of that escapade in the south west and Birmingham airport

  • Thang Laka says:

    Do try to reach the state of Buddha's Nivarna – that a person is free and who is strong enough to say whatever comes I accept as best

  • Amit Bauddh says:

    Namo buddhaye

  • Amit Bauddh says:

    Verry good speech

  • Chad Burrows says:

    This video led me to her book and her book was such an inspiration to me. Thank you Emma la.

  • Arnold Agrees says:

    they should get a monk from the most ancient original branch of Buddhism to talk which is (Theravada branch) would give more insight into things

  • sunil Dissanayake says:

    Namo Buddhaya! understanding of you self help you to understand the whole world . you be with your religion and study about budism. you can study it because it is the reality in this world . may you attain Nibbhana !!!!

  • C-Dog A says:

    Thanks for sharing this wonderful story of your transformation. Yes the mud exists and even the darker stuff below the mud that I went through.

  • Serbia Care Act says:

    She needs Jesus, and I suspect she’ll find him. He is the One whom Siddhartha Gautama said would come after him and be known as “Love,” and the One after whom all religions and indeed all human souls are seeking. May God save and enlighten her, through the prayers of the Theotokos. Amen!

  • william5177 says:

    Lesson learned. Never look up Buddhism on YouTube.

  • Orlando says:

    Can one be Buddhist and still practice other religions?

  • r é d o z i e r says:

    beautiful story! Thank you for sharing

  • Mindrolling says:

    Bhutan sounds like a wonderful kingdom as far as kingdoms (and even some ‘democracies’) go!

  • godsmacks1000 says:

    Pardon my ignorance, but Buddhism seems like it's mostly a theology that focuses on peace and happiness and an escape from real life. It's like Buddhists almost try to create some type of fictitious utopian world for themselves. Other religions seem to have more structure when it comes to the relationship between G-d and humanity. These religions (such as Judaism) also emphasize the importance of being kind and doing good for the world while still being grounded in reality.

  • Doctor Cereal says:

    I love how everyone in the comments thinks they're so wise.

  • AF5IU says:

    I really enjoyed this. I really need a lot of help here.

  • Dr Tsewang dj says:

    Buddha taught love , compassion and tolerance

  • Dr Tsewang dj says:

    Buddhism is deviod of dogma and theories. It teaches about rational and scientific analysis

  • Shawli says:

    It is wonderful to start New year with this wonderful life experience. Shat shat Naman to Wise Buddhist Nun.

  • Agniva Maiti says:

    Aum… Buddham Sharanam Gachhami..

  • Safal Timilsena says:

    Buddha was born in Nepal🇳🇵

  • Sam B says:

    Did somebody say Yoga?

  • arias2832 says:

    Great talk, thank you.

  • Isabel Esteves says:

    Emma Slade you hsve such inner peace there are no words that. Can describe I am extremly Grateful that you share your Vídeo OM Shanti

  • shawn mft8 says:

    The Buddha and Zarathustra can show us the way to a Compassionate and a honest Life.

  • Ich Bin says:

    so it was a lucky incident what happened in Jakarta …..

  • Mayaculpa Mayaculpa says:

    The Blessings are yours.pema karma kunzang

  • Doubtfull1988 says:

    Jeah good idea to let one moment in your life define the rest.

  • Reza Mokhtari says:

    thanks a million to you for sharing your out of this world experience with us!Please tell me how to be a monk like you?

  • sun set says:

    Everthing comes from
    Your weaknesse of
    Unhappiness.i believe in
    Nichiren daishonin in
    Nichiren shousu more
    Than fourty years and
    Have all my happiness
    Al my life.nichiren daishonina real budda too
    Atain enlightment eight
    Hunderd years ago
    Teaching said your
    Life is a workbook
    Of couse and effect.

  • Bandula Liyanagama says:

    Buddhism is the law of nature. Right way of living.

  • 12 GSC says:

    The speech was really grt…..

  • animate 3d says:

    Buddhism is an universal philosophy ….. not a typical religion

  • Alfred Puglisi says:

    PTSD, I know about that. Thank you for posting.

  • amila Ss says:

    Its like a costume isn’t it. You haven’t learned anything dear. Been a monk isn’t about charity dear it’s about you. 😂😂

  • Tenzin D says:

    She is one True Inspiring Soul ….Her Smile Tell it all ..how happy her decision was … Respect for all she did ….Her Sacrifice her devotion is beyond anyone's
    atleast not easy for people like us as a lay People ..it takes a Lot to go on a Path like that away from Cities… Families….Love ones ..
    Namo Buddha
    Thank You Ted

  • V 4 VENDETTA says:

    HINDUNISM (open ideology) religions into two main philosophical branches of astika, which venerates Veda (six orthodox schools ) and nastika  (e.g., Buddhism, Jainism, sikhism, etc.). However, both branches shared the related concepts of Yoga, saṃsāra (the cycle of birth and death) and moksha (liberation from that cycle)…thanks indus vally to give our  ancestors valueble info to nxt generations..

  • Harry McNicholas says:

    Youed tube only presents the monk's way.   You can also practice the non monk's way.  Sitting in a temple on top of some mountain or deep in the jungle will get you nowhere.  You are abandoning life and not embracing it.  YOu must get right into the dirt and grime of the city.  The noise etc.  A baby just cried, a car horn just honked, all is at it should be.

  • Danial M says:

    All ladies in the world please be like her.. are you agree with me?

  • Matthew Rodriguez says:

    Buddha was an ascetic psychologist and his odd teachings failed to reach like Abrahamic ones.

  • Jai Shankar says:

    @
    Choose a career by Choice

  • Leki Choden says:

    Om Mani Padme Hung

  • A VERY horny Mr.Dinosaur says:

    this video gives me PTSD, its a real disorder you guys.. your very insensitive if you think that my PTSD is any less serious than anyone elses :'/

  • Lobsang Nyima says:

    ridiculousness..

  • Romel Jade Reyes says:

    Goosebumps when she recited the mantra❤😮

  • Camila Uribe Noreña says:

    How can i learn as much as she did about the mind , at how to understand it and be one with it as when i was younger? I have OCD and need learn to have peace

  • Shin Wolford says:

    I want to be a Buddhist.

  • Wally Welder says:

    I must admit. Seeing the attacker shot up would've brought me great peace and joy.

  • Sunshine1980ize says:

    Buddhism was spread by king Ashoka in India from Afghanistan to Shri Lanka and abroad 😊. However, Islamic conversion destroyed everything in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Forcefully converting them to Muslims. I hope these noble people are safe always.

  • Jeffin Solomon says:

    Jesus Christ is the Way ,the Truth and the Life.

  • batman says:

    What tickles me about western men and women is that they decide to become monks in their late 50s and 60s and so on in their elder years after they've lived their younger lives partying and enjoying life,then they make the big decision. It's very different in Buddhist countries when they do it at a very young age 20s and less even.

  • Yash Salve says:

    the ancient one.

  • Holly Blue says:

    I legit started tearing up when she recited the mantra.

  • JapanJohnny2012 says:

    'Emma was previously a successful investment banker'. Well it was either this or starting a craft brewery, I suppose, then 😉

  • Mike J says:

    Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu!!!

  • Malaya Das says:

    Nmo Buddya

  • ARAVINDHAN HARISH says:

    TED videos have much more than story of the speaker. I don't want to disrespect her achievement or the path she took but she could said more about buddhism and life rather than just narrating her story and at the end marketing her book and charity. TED videos convey a message or idea that is unknown or overlooked by us. After watching this video for 12 minutes all I got was "Your life is in your hands. ", which was not I was looking for.

  • Enjoy Life with Me says:

    I keep coming back to hear her chant.

  • Bunni Hugger says:

    What a beautiful soul

  • K Butler says:

    Yes, this one…. Touched me. And a few before her. I am glad I found her via YouTube.

  • bodu maga/ buddhist way says:

    Buddhist way is the one and only path to eradication of suffering or dukkha

  • Ekaterina says:

    Why do Buddhist have to look like that? I thought Buddhism is a spiritual way of life and has nothing to do with appearances. One would have to constantly keep looking in the mirror to remind yourself "I'm a Buddhist".
    But I don't know anything about anything.

  • Martha Cain says:

    Change~the ultimate opt to out, be free as all is a sort of transportation, to carry us beyond our present place in real time…trasatory, impermanent human existence has but one "antidote for PTSD" ~LOVE~May Buddha bless us all~

  • osman solja says:

    Lost white goat 😁

  • Dennis Y says:

    Sadhu sadhu sadhu

  • TravelNUnbox says:

    Put the speed *2 thank me later

  • ron rony says:

    Wisdom of this world is just a mere foolishness and Salvation is only THROUGH JESUS CHRIST

  • Diego Rey says:

    Y didn’t anyone tell me Dr.Strange was real

  • Raja says:

    Ah, Buddhism; the anti-Brahmin movement of 2500 years ago. I seriously doubt that the Buddha wanted to create a breakaway religion, just wanted to advise people about their minds, attitudes and behaviors. Fast forward to the 2000s, and the heart of Buddhism is Mindfulness practice, which is what psychologists teach their patients to help overcome all kinds of mental disorders. I call myself a Hindu-Buddhist-Taoist, and have learned to blend the teachings of all these paths. Buddhism is a agnostic practice; no discussion of God/s allowed. That does not sit well with me, but I won't get into that. And the essential teaching is to "take refuge" in the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. When I studied Buddhism, I immediately rejected that. After all, the greatest source of wisdom is deep within our minds, and THAT is where our refuge should be. Once you learn how to ride a bicycle, you don't need someone to keep holding the bicycle!
    One last thing: the Pali word Dukkha has been translated as "suffering." But Dukkha usually translates as sadness. Not suffering. It refers to how our lives can be devoid of satisfaction and true joy. In the Yoga tradition, the deepest part of the mind is the layer of bliss, called Ananda maya. (aananda; maya is pronounced different with short syllables, from maaya which means illusion). This bliss layer gets obscured by the ego mind like clouds obscuring the sun. So our true innate nature is that of bliss, and not dukkha. Dukkha is simply what we create with our minds. See a child happily playing, and then think whether the child lives in Dukkha!!! Yes, the Dukkha will come once the child grows up and gets married, haha! 🙂 Just kidding, just kidding!
    And oh, one more thing: the two countries in the world where Buddhism is predominant, Sri Lanka and Myanmar, are full of hateful and intolerant people. So much for Buddhism, which becomes just a fixture you put on the wall and then do exactly as you please.

  • Ashden Gibson says:

    Got a strong emotional charge when I heard her sing the mantra. So much sorrow, with an undertone of compassion.

  • Pilatos Clash says:

    Beautiful path thank you for sharing

  • Apurva ts says:

    I AM THE WAY, THE TRUTH, THE LIFE.
    ~ JESUS CHRIST

  • Bones and Avocado says:

    Om Mani Padma Hum is by far my favorite mantra as well.

  • blookyblops and the tinfoil hat gang says:

    in the first 5 minutes of hearing her speak and dress i realized this person is still on a lower rung of zen

  • художник says:

    Does people know vajrayana tantrik buddhism?

  • Nerilen Smith says:

    BUDDHA IS PROUD..well done !

  • SGI- Philippines Buddhism says:

    It's been two years and still in my recommendation page. Thanks for spreading the word. Bless u all I'm Buddhist from Philippines

  • SGI- Philippines Buddhism says:

    U r a great leader and a model i hope many will follow ur path

  • Sanjay Ram says:

    One who runs away from.worldly duties cannot be trusted.

  • Lim Sreyneang says:

    Actually she shouldn't be a Buddhist monk ,She should be a Buddhist nun.Well,as a Buddhist since my birth,I think she should learn more about Buddhist culture

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